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ENVS 4940 Field Research in the Ecological Arts: American Indian Collection at Cornell

Cornell Library Resources

Edward S. Curtis. “Chaíwa. Tewa, Profile,” from The North American Indian, Vol. XII, The Hopi, 1922. Photogravure.The Collection

Olin Library houses the majority of materials in American Indian Studies among disciplines such as history, archaeology, government, linguistics, literature, sociology, folklore, women’s studies, and others. Mann Library (physical and biological anthropology, rural sociology, education), Music, Fine Arts, Law, and other Cornell libraries also hold resources in American Indian Studies.

The Kroch Library Rare and Manuscript Division houses a strong American Indian History and Culture collection. In 2004, Cornell acquired the Huntington Free Library Collection-- vastly enriching its resources in American Indian materials. The circulating collection was incorporated into the larger collection in Olin Library and Kroch Rare and Manuscript Collections houses the non-circulating material.

 

 

 

Edward S. Curtis. “Chaíwa. Tewa, Profile,”
from The North American Indian, Vol. XII,
The Hopi, 1922. Photogravure.

Haudonesse

The Smithsonian's National American Indian Museum offers many useful resources on indigenous peoples including the Haudenosaunee who settled in the Ithaca area. You can find an educator's guide with information on the history and culture of the Haudenosaunee by doing a search on the Museum website.