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Islam in Asia: Diversity in Past and Present Exhibition: Islam in China

An Exhibition organized by The Division of Asia Collections at Kroch Library, November, 2016 - April, 2017

Islam in China

Islam in China [map]. 1: 20,000,000. In Hugh Kennedy (ed.), An Historical Atlas of Islam. (2nd, revised ed.) Leiden: Brill, 2002 (p. 68).

Islam entered China by two main routes: from the southeast, following the well-established maritime communication lines to Canton; and from the northwest, passing over the Pamirs and through the Tarim Basin to Kansu and Shensi, following the ancient Silk Road.

Many of these Muslim merchants, soldiers and freebooters settled down and married Chinese wives, giving rise to today’s Hui (Chinese-speaking) Muslim. China also has a small Iranian community of Tajiks in the far west, and a group of Muslims with Mongol blood, the Tung-hsiang, in Kansu. All Chinese Muslims are Sunnī Ḥanafī, except the Tajiks, who are Nizārī Ismaʿīlī, or followers of the Aga Khan.

The number of Chinese Muslims is projected to increase from 23.3 million in 2010 to nearly 30 million in 2030. Only three other countries where Muslims are the minority – India, Nigeria and Ethiopia – have more than 20 million Muslims. 

Data Source:  The Future of the Global Muslim Population. The Pew Research Center.  (Polling and Analysis.  January 27, 2011).

Life on the old Silk Road: the Uighurs of Kashgar – in pictures / https://www.theguardian.com

 

  • Annotated Turki Manuscripts from the Jarring Collection Online Chaghatay 2.0 Web site hosts information about late Chaghatay (a variety of Middle Turkic spoken in Central Asia) and its descendants, especially those varieties spoken east of the Pamirs: early modern Uyghur (Turki) and modern Uyghur. The information here stems largely from projects directed by Prof. Arienne M. Dwyer of the University of Kansas and C.M. Sperberg-McQueen of Black Mesa Technologies.

China, Islam and the Middle East.  Sociology of Islam Journal: Special Issues (2017) Guest Editor: Tugrul Keskin

Islam in China

Islam in China

Islam entered China by two main routes: from the south-east, following the well-established maritime communication lines to Canton; and from the north-west, passing over the Pamirs and through the Tarim Basin to Kansu and Shensi, following the ancient Silk Road.

Many of the Muslim merchants, soldiers and freebooters who entered China via these routes (predominantly Arabs and Persians in the south-east, and Turks and Persians in the north-west) settled down and married Chinese wives, thus giving rise to the Hui (Chinese-speaking) Muslim community which is today scattered throughout China. Besides the Hui and the Turkic Muslims, China also has a small Iranian community of Tajiks in the far west, and a group of Muslims with Mongol blood, the Tung-hsiang, in Kansu. All Chinese Muslims are Sunnī anafī, with the single exception of the Tajiks, who are Nizārī Ismaʿīlī, or followers of the Aga Khan. Chinese Muslims, and in particular the Hui, are divided into numerous local sects. The most important Sufi group is the Nakshbandiyya.

Muslims make up about 2% of the population in China, but because the country is so populous, its Muslim population is expected to be the 19th largest in the world in 2030. The Muslim population in China is projected to increase from 23.3 million in 2010 to nearly 30 million in 2030. Of all the countries in the world where Muslims live as religious minorities, only three others – India, Nigeria and Ethiopia – have more than 20 million Muslims. 

Data Source:  The Future of the Global Muslim Population. The Pew Research Center.  (Polling and Analysis.  January 27, 2011.

Resource in Chinese

Resource in English