Definitions

From Jean Stefancic & Richard Delgado, Critical Race Theory: An Introduction, (2010):

  • Critical Race Theory: The critical race theory (CRT) movement is a collection of activists and scholars interested in studying and transforming the relationship among race, racism, and power. The movement considers many of the same issues that conventional civil rights and ethnic studies discourses take up, but places them in a broader perspective that includes economics, history, context, group- and self-interest, and even feelings and the unconscious. Unlike traditional civil rights, which embraces incrementalism and step-by-step progress, critical race theory questions the very foundations of the liberal order, including equality theory, legal reasoning, Enlightenment rationalism, and neutral principles of constitutional law. 
  • Intersectionality: CRT scholar Kimberlé Crenshaw's idea that individuals and classes often have shared or overlapping interests or traits. See: Kimberle Crenshaw, Mapping the Margins: Intersectionality, Identity Politics, and Violence against Women of Color, 43 Stan. L. REV. 1241 (1991).
  • Interest Convergence: CRT scholar Derrick Bell's idea that racial progress has historically occurred when the interests of the races converged. See: Derrick A. Bell Jr., Brown v. Board of Education and the Interest-Convergence Dilemma, 93 HARV. L. REV. 518 (1980).
  • Praxis: Practice grounded in critical theory.

From Ibram X. Kendi, How to be an Antiracist, (2019):

  • Racist: One who is supporting a racist policy through their actions or inaction or expressing a racist idea.
  • Anti-racist: One who is supporting an antiracist policy through their actions or expressing an antiracist idea. 

Critical Race Theory for the Law School Curricula

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