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Cornell Tech FAQ: Career Research FAQ

Career Research FAQ

Welcome!

This FAQ should help you get started with your career research.  Though it outlines a lot of great resources and strategies, many of you will be exploring topics not covered in this set of questions.  Not to worry!  All you need to do is contact us at cutech-library@cornell.edu and a member of our research team will be in touch to answer your question, schedule a one-on-one consultation to address your individual research needs, or assist you in any other way possible.

Good luck with your job search!

The Cornell Tech Library Team

How do I get compensation data for a company?

Compensation is private information, so generally speaking, it will not be easy to find this type of data, but the following resources may help shed some light on the matter.

Take a look at the College of Engineering's Post Graduate Reports to get a sense of where students went and what their starting salaries were.  In addition, Vault has some salary information as does Glassdoor.com

Executive compensation packages are published in the "Proxy" statement, an SEC filing which contains items on which shareholders must vote. You can search for individual proxy statements on a company's investor relations website. If you are looking at a large number of companies you can view just the extracted compensation data for thousands of U.S. companies via the ExecuComp.

How can I get in touch with a research librarian?

Research staff can meet with you multiple times during your job search, to help guide you toward appropriate resources for the information you need during different phases of your search. Additionally, we can arrange for career workshop targeted for your club. Sign up for a job search research consultation.

Do you have any databases for job searching?

See our resources arranged by the careers tag.

Where can I find industry guides?

All Cornell students have access to Vault's Online Career Library>.  If this is your first time using Vault, you will need to sign-up using your Cornell email address.

I am on the closed interview list for a company I know nothing about. Help!

If you are trying to secure a job with a particular firm, see our  Management Library Guides, including Career Research Tips for NYC Tech.

What research tools can I use to learn about start-ups? In CA? In NYC?

Learn more about how startups are doing by looking through Silicon Valley Bank’s Outlook Survey.

Looking for jobs at start-ups?  This Forbes article is a great place to start. 

Need more help networking?  Try the following books available from the library and delivered to your campus:

  • The 2-Hour Job Search – Outlines a systematic approach to networking, as well as securing the first interview with a potential employer.
  • How to Win Friends and Influence People – Best-selling guide to interpersonal relationships provides suggestions to successfully dealing with people both in social and business situations.
  • Never Eat Alone – A guide to the art of networking reveals the fundamental principles of what it takes to build lasting, mutually beneficial relationships. 
  • Me 2.0: Build a powerful brand to achieve career success – Provides tools for building a powerful personal brand to give you a competitive advantage in the marketplace.

Browse through the O’Reilly publications focused on topics like Lean Startup and Personal & Professional Development through the library’s subscription to Safari Books Online.

StartUpHire.com is a great resource that is sponsored by the likes of the National Venture Capital Association, Morrison Foerster and the NSF.  You might also consider the job sections at AngelList and Hacker News (which also includes startups funded at some point by Y Combinator).  New sites focused on start-up positions are popping up all the time.  Try Googling to see what new sites are available.  Found a site that helped you find a job?  Please share!

Looking in NYC?  Take advantage of the Made in NYC campaign.  The NY Tech Meetup Association is a non-profit organization with over 40k members supporting the New York technology community and holds events where you can hone your networking skills.  AlleyWatch covers the news in the tech industry in NYC.

Looking in CA?  Stay up to date with the Silicon Valley Venture Capital Survey, Silicon Valley, and Business Insider (formerly Silicon Alley Insider).  Heard of the Founder Institute?  It might be a great place to network and meet future partners.

What research tools can I consult in my search for a job in the tech sector?

The best tool to consult is a research librarian at the Management Library.  You can schedule a one-on-one consultation with a librarian who will walk you through research strategies customized to meet your personal career research needs.  Simply email mgtref@cornell.edu with your question and a member of our team will be in touch to schedule.

Looking at working at a start-up?  Look at the “What research tools can I use to learn about start-ups? In CA? In NYC?” FAQ.

Do a little reading - Browse through the O’Reilly publications focused on topics like Lean Startup and Personal & Professional Development through the library’s subscription to Safari Books Online.

Interested in learning more about the industry?  Take a look at Frost & Sullivan.  Frost & Sullivan provides in-depth market research and strategy reports with European and global coverage of emerging technologies in the following areas: Aerospace & Defense; Automotive & Transportation; Chemicals, Materials and Food; Electronics & Security; Energy & Power Supplies; Environment & Building Technologies; Healthcare; Industrial Automation & Process Control; Information & Communication Technologies; Measurement & Instrumentation.

Want to learn what’s been happening with a company/industry/technology?  Try running an article search in Factiva for newspaper articles and/or Business Source Complete or ProQuest for trade journal articles.  You should also consider following news/blogs that will keep you informed.  This is a great question to ask during an informational interview.  Find out what your network finds valuable and evaluate those sources for yourself. You can also try subscribing to email or setting up an RSS feed for the following resources Or try aggregators like Hacker News and Techmeme:

Not sure what types of positions are available?  Vault’s IT & Engineering Guides are a great place to get started.  There’s even a Guide to Technology Careers!  Be sure to use your Cornell email address when signing up for a login.  To find the guides, go to the guides tab on the top menu and select from the left hand menu to find IT & Engineering.

Need more help networking?  Try the following books available from the library and have them delivered to you in NYC:

  • The 2-Hour Job Search – Outlines a systematic approach to networking, as well as securing the first interview with a potential employer.
  • How to Win Friends and Influence People – Best-selling guide to interpersonal relationships provides suggestions to successfully dealing with people both in social and business situations.
  • Never Eat Alone – A guide to the art of networking reveals the fundamental principles of what it takes to build lasting, mutually beneficial relationships. 
  • Me 2.0: Build a powerful brand to achieve career success – Provides tools for building a powerful personal brand to give you a competitive advantage in the marketplace.

Not finding what you need?  Contact the Management Library Research Team for assistance.

What resources are available to learn about VC funding of start-ups?

If you’re trying to get a general sense of what is happening in the world of venture capital, you might want to consult with the National Venture Capital Association, especially the “For Entrepreneurs” tab.  pwc’s MoneyTree also provides aggregate data on what is happening in VC as an industry, firm and investee specific data, and an ability to search by industry and funding stage.  Why do you need to know this?  If you’re looking to start a company in a particular sector, it’s helpful to understand the funding trends taking place in your space. 

Looking to do a more in-depth analysis?  Thomson One (which can only be viewed in Internet Explorer) allows you to compile funding data by geography, stage, and industry.  Go to Screening & Analytics > Private Equity > Companies & Investors Search > Entities Involved In  > select All Venture Capital Deals, All MoneyTree Deals or VCReporter Deals.

Interested in learning more about finding firms or learning more about them?  CrunchBase will help to keep you up to date on who is funding what, as well as provide you with firm specific information on the VCs covered.  They also provide great profiles of VC firms.  Entrepreneur magazine features their list of VC100.  Forbes has a Top Ten list. 

Keep up to date by following the news:

Try AngelList if you’re looking for funding.  It’s a social networking site for funders and young businesses.

You might also want to consider a start-up accelerator.  Y Combinator is one well known accelerator.  AlleyWatch covers 14 New York based accelerators

Ready to pitch?  Canaan Partners’ Entrepreneurship Pitch Workbook walks you through how to do it.

Need more assistance or looking for something else?  Contact the Management Library Research Team.

Where/how can I learn more about VC firms?

pwc’s MoneyTree also provides aggregate data on what is happening in VC as a whole, firm and investee specific data, and an ability to search by industry and funding stage.  Why do you need to know this?  If you’re looking to start a company in a particular sector, it’s helpful to understand the funding trends taking place in your space. 

Looking to do a more in-depth analysis?  Thomson One (which can only be viewed in Internet Explorer) allows you to compile funding data by geography, stage, and industry.  Go to Screening & Analytics > Private Equity > Companies & Investors Search > Entities Involved In  > select All Venture Capital Deals, All MoneyTree Deals or VCReporter Deals.

Interested in learning more about finding firms or learning more about them?  CrunchBase will help to keep you up to date on who is funding what, as well as provide you with firm specific information on the VCs covered.  They also provide great profiles of VC firms.  Entrepreneur magazine features their list of VC100.  Forbes has a Top Ten list. 

Where/how can I learn more about consulting? What about consulting firms specializing in technology?

If you are new to consulting, you might want to start with a Vault Career Guide, such as the Vault Career Guide to Consulting or the Vault Guide to Technology Careers (which can be found in the Guides tab).  If this is your first time using Vault, please be sure to create your login with your Cornell email account.

The Vault Guide to the Top 10 Technology Consulting Firms will provide you with in-depth understanding of several “best to work for” consulting firms.  Looking for niche firms?  Check out Gale’s Consultants and Consulting Organizations Directory or take a look at Career Search.  You might also want to consider seeking out firms mentioned in Consulting Magazine, the industry’s trade journal.

Because consulting firms tend to be privately held companies, SWOTs are generally only available for the well-known firms.  You can try searching Business Source Complete using the keywords company name and SWOT.  If you’re looking at niche or smaller firms, you’ll likely need to run news and trade journal article searches.  The best databases in which to run these searches are Factiva for newspapers and Business Source Complete or ProQuest for trade journals.

Professional and trade associations are great ways to learn about firms and what’s going on within the industry.  To find one that would meet your needs, just Google your industry and association

Prepping for case interviews?  CQ Interactive is the online companion to Marc Consentino’s classic, Case in PointAce Your Case also provides you with practice cases and advice by WetFeet.

Where/how can I learn more about careers in finance?

Vault’s career guide section has 14 guides focused on Banking and Finance.  If this is your first time using Vault, you will need to create a login.  Please be sure to use your Cornell email address.  To find the guides, go to the Guides tab on the far right of the landing page > Banking & Finance.  There’s even a Finance Interviews Practice Guide.

Consider reading:

Stay up to date with Seeking Alpha and sign up for DealB%k’s newsletter. 

Studying a publicly traded company?  Be sure to become familiar with equity reports to get an unbiased view of the company.  Be sure to read the company’s earnings conference call transcripts so you can build insightful questions to ask during the interview.  You can find both analyst reports and conference call transcripts through the Research tab of Thomson One.  This database can only be viewed in Internet Explorer and make sure pop-ups from this database are allowed.  Go to the Research Tab of any company > select Advanced Research Page on the top right hand corner > search for reports on your company. 

Where/how can I learn more about Private Equity firms?

Looking to understand jobs in PE?  The Vault Career Guide to Private Equity should help.  There is also a guide to PE and Hedge Fund Interviews.  If this is your first time using Vault, you will need to create a login.  Please be sure to use your Cornell email address.  To find the guides, go to the Guides tab on the far right of the landing page >Wealth Management.

Stay up to date with Bloomberg Businessweek’s PE coverage in their Markets & Finance section, the PE section of NYTimes’ DealB%k, and Reuters’ PE HUB.

Forbes provides a list of The Top 50 Dealmakers, Private Equity International (which can be found in Factiva > Search > Search Builder > Source = Private Equity International) puts together their PEI300 (register on their site for free for access to their executive summary of the list), and Prequin has their Top 10 PE firms.

Trade associations are often a wealth of information.  The Private Equity Growth Capital Council is no different.  The Research section provides case studies, white papers, and research articles.  Under the About section, provides you with a list of member PE firms including Apollo, Silver Lake, and Vector Capital.

Looking to do a more in-depth analysis?  Thomson One (which can only be viewed in Internet Explorer) is the database for you.  Go to Screening & Analytics > Private Equity.  From this tab you can choose several search options including fundraising, investments, and exits.

Where/how can I learn more about careers for engineers?

Looking to understand what type of jobs are available to engineers?  The Vault Career Guide to Engineering jobs should help.  In fact, there is a whole section of IT and Engineering guides.  If this is your first time using Vault, you will need to create a login.  Please be sure to use your Cornell email address.  To find the guides, go to the Guides tab on the far right of the landing page >IT & Engineering.

Professional and trade associations and societies often provide career information and the Association for Computing Machinery does just that.  ACM also has a career and job center as does IEEE Computer Society.

Browse through the O’Reilly publications focused on topics like Lean Startup and Personal & Professional Development through the library’s subscription to Safari Books Online.

Want to see where other Cornell Computer Science students have landed?  Take a look at Cornell Engineering’s Post Graduate Reports for Computer Science graduate students.  These reports also include starting salaries!  The Bureau of Labor Statistics provide in-depth information on a variety of Computer and Information Technology occupations, including median pay and job outlook.

The 2-Hour Job Search by Steve Dalton, an MBA and Chemical Engineer, outlines a systematic approach to looking at your job search with a focus on networking, as well as securing the first interview with a potential employer.

Need more help networking?  Try the following books available from the library and have them delivered to you in NYC:

Where/how can I learn more about business development?

This job function can be found in every industry, so to get started, check out the following articles:

Books that might interest you:

Need to learn more about a specific industry or market in which you might be working?  IBISWorld and S&P NetAdvantage are great places to start.  First Research reports also provide interview questions.  You can find these reports in ProQuest > Browse > Industry and Market Research > First Research > select the industry > be sure to sort by date.

Where/how can I learn more about careers in software development/engineering?

Looking to understand jobs in software development/engineering?  The Vault Career Guides to Computer Software Jobs and IT Jobs should help.  If this is your first time using Vault, you will need to create a login.  Please be sure to use your Cornell email address.  To find the guides, go to the Guides tab on the far right of the landing page > IT & Engineering.

The following sites will provide you with a good idea of what to expect as a software engineer/developer:

Browse through the O’Reilly publications focused on topics like Lean Startup and Personal & Professional Development through the library’s subscription to Safari Books OnlineBeing Geek – The software developer’s career handbook is available for checkout from the library.

 

Welcome!

This FAQ should help you get started with your career research.  Though it outlines a lot of great resources and strategies, many of you will be exploring topics not covered in this set of questions.  Not to worry!  All you need to do is contact us at cutech-library@cornell.edu and a member of our research team will be in touch to answer your question, schedule a one-on-one consultation to address your individual research needs, or assist you in any other way possible.

Good luck with your job search!

The Cornell Tech Library Team