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Introduction to HTML: Second
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A bare bones introduction to HTML coding

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Historic Cornell Locations


Ho Plaza

Located at the crossroads of campus, Ho Plaza serves as 
Cornell's town square. Here, between Willard Straight Hall and the Cornell Store, students chalk announcements of meetings on the 
sidewalk and stage stunts to publicize upcoming events. At the beginning of the school year, campus organizations pitch tents and 
hand out information to new students. On the last day of classes, African American and Latino fraternities hold step-dance 
competitions on the Straight's front stairs. 

McGraw Tower

McGraw Tower is the most recognizable symbol of Cornell University. The famed Cornell Chimes is one of the oldest musical traditions 
on campus. At the base of the tower, Uris Library is a spacious and well-furnished study spot, and a great place for students to 
work on research projects and papers. The famed Cornell Chimes is one of the oldest musical traditions on campus. At the base of the 
tower, Uris Library is a spacious and well-furnished study spot, and a great place for students to work on research projects and 
papers.                                          

Sage Chapel

Cornell's founders firmly believed that no single religion should be steward to a university with as much to offer as Cornell. 
Services each week in beautiful Sage Chapel may be led by a rabbi, a Baptist minister, an astrophysicist, or a student. Choral groups, 
such as the Cornell University Glee Club, benefit from the superb acoustics, and an Aeolian-Skinner organ with 3,850 pipes 
makes the chapel an ideal setting for both music and devotion. 

Ezra Cornell Statue

The figure of Ezra Cornell is silhouetted by the last rays of sun fading in the west. Abraham Lincoln signed the Morrill Land Grant 

Act in 1862, calling for each state to establish colleges for the teaching of "agriculture and the mechanic arts." Ezra Cornell 
donated his fortune and his farmland on Ithaca's East Hill in pursuit of his liberal-minded vision of a university where "any person 
can find instruction in any  study." The figure of Ezra Cornell is silhouetted by the last rays of sun fading in the west. Abraham 
Lincoln signed the Morrill Land Grant Act in 1862, calling for each state to establish colleges for the teaching of "agriculture and 
the mechanic arts." Ezra Cornell donated his fortune and his farmland on Ithaca's East Hill in pursuit of his liberal-minded vision 
of a university where "any person can find instruction in any  study." 


Johnson Museum

Rising prominently at the edge of the campus, the Herbert F. Johnson Museum of Art offers panoramic views of Cornell, Cayuga 
Lake, and Ithaca. The renowned architect I. M. Pei designed the building's unique profile so that viewers on campus would still have 
a view of the sunset. The museum features exceptional collections of Asian and American artwork and a large collection of prints, 
and hosts many traveling exhibitions.