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NTRES 3300 Natural Resources Planning and Management: Home

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Mann Library supports the instruction, research, and extension programs of Cornell University's College of Agriculture and Life Sciences and College of Human Ecology.

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Welcome

 
 
This research guide provides helpful hints, approaches and links for conducting a thorough and comprehensive literature search for evidence to build management plans for case studies of conservation issues. This includes both the published literature found in scholarly journals, as well as gray literature such as government reports and conference proceedings.  Navigate the guide using the blue tabs above or the following links:
 
 
Image credit: African elephant in Amboseli National Park, Kenya by Paul Mannix, via Wikimedia Commons, https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/c/c6/Loxodonta_africana_-Amboseli_National_Park%2C_Kenya-8.jpg/1280px-Loxodonta_africana_-Amboseli_National_Park%2C_Kenya-8.jpg, CC BY-SA 2.0

Erica Johns

Erica Johns
Contact:
Mann Library
607-255-0158
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Off-Campus Access to Full-Text

If you're off-campus and want access to full-text, you can either go to the resource via the library website or use the hand PASSKEY tool. Using either method, you will be prompted to log in with your netID and password to gain access to our licensed resources.

Types of scholarly literature

You will encounter many types of articles and it is important to distinguish between these different categories of scholarly literature.  Keep in mind the following definitions.

Peer-reviewed (or refereed):  Refers to articles that have undergone a rigorous review process, often including revisions to the original manuscript, by peers in their discipline, before publication in a scholarly journal.  This can include empirical studies, review articles, meta-analyses among others.

Empirical study (or primary article):  An empirical study is one that aims to gain new knowledge on a topic through direct or indirect observation and research.  These include quantitative or qualitative data and analysis. In science, an empirical article will often include the following sections:  Introduction, Methods, Results, and Discussion.

Review article:  In the scientific literature, this is a type of article that provides a synthesis of existing research on a particular topic.  These are useful when you want to get an idea of a body of research that you are not yet familiar with.  It differs from a systematic review in that it does not aim to capture ALL of the research on a particular topic.

Systematic review:  This is a methodical and thorough literature review focused on a particular research question.  It's aim is to identify and synthesize all of the scholarly research on a particular topic in an unbiased, reproducible way to provide evidence for practice and policy-making.  It may involve a meta-analysis (see below). 

Meta-analysis:  This is a type of research study that combines or contrasts data from different independent studies in a new analysis in order to strengthen the understanding of a particular topic.  There are many methods, some complex, applied to performing this type of analysis.